Candy Cane arches of Cordoba

We took a train from Seville to Cordoba to visit the Candy cane double arches of Mesquita – also called the Grand Mosque or Cathedral of Cordoba.  The Mesquita takes your breath away upon entry. It makes you feel as though you are in a hall of mirrors. Although originally built as a Mosque, the centre of this magnificent building was converted to a Cathedral after the Christians conquered Spain, the important parts of what was a Mosque are still in tact like the open courtyard once used for ablution rituals and the Kibla wall facing Mecca, there is a forest of pillars made from different colored granite, marble and alabaster supporting dozens of horse shoe arches, that looks like candy canes – then right in the centre is the spectacular alter, choir stalls and pipe organ which would grace any Christian place of worship.  Traditionally, the mihrab of a mosque faces in the direction of Mecca; by facing the mihrab, worshipers pray towards Mecca. Mecca is east-southeast of the mosque, but the mihrab of this mosque unusually points south.

When it was lunch time we walked around the tiny streets around the Mesquita till we found a menu we liked.  Lunch at the Las Piconeras was one of the best we had in Andalucía – we had the best Paella,  fried eggplant with honey, olives and salmorejo – which is like gazpacho but richer and smoother. Even though it was hot we loved just walking around and enjoying the ambiance of Cordoba.  We went to the Flower street, walked around the small alleyways and did some souvenir shopping.

The history buff in our family aka Miss Teen wanted to go see the Alcázar de los Reyes Cristianos (Spanish for “Alcázar of the Christian Monarchs”).  She educated us that – Isabella and her husband Ferdinand used the Alcázar for one of the first permanent tribunals of the Spanish Inquisition and as a headquarters for their campaign against the Nasrid dynasty in Granada which was the last of the Moorish kingdom in the Iberian Peninsula.  The monarchs are said to have met Christopher Columbus in the Alcázar as he prepared to take his first voyage to the Americas. The Alcázar also later served as a garrison for Napoleon Bonaparte’s troops in 1800.

We then walked on the Roman bridge built over the Guadalquivir river, this river runs through the entire length of Spain. There are plenty of other things to do in Cordoba.  It took just 45 minutes to get from Seville to Cordoba on the high-speed AVE train line. We learnt quite a bit about the history of Cordoba on our little trip there!

Candy Cane arches of Cordoba
Candy Cane arches of Cordoba

The Bell tower, La Mezquita

Candy Cane arches of Cordoba
Candy Cane arches of Cordoba

The Gardens and Orange trees, La Mezquita

Candy Cane arches of Cordoba
Candy Cane arches of Cordoba

The interior halls and double arches columns of jasper, onyx, marble, and granite in La Mezquita

Candy Cane arches of Cordoba

Candy Cane arches of Cordoba

The richly gilded prayer niche or Mihrab, La Mezquita

Candy Cane arches of Cordoba
Candy Cane arches of Cordoba Candy Cane arches of Cordoba

Candy Cane arches of Cordoba
Candy Cane arches of Cordoba

The Chapel, La Mezquita

Candy Cane arches of Cordoba
Candy Cane arches of Cordoba
Candy Cane arches of Cordoba
Candy Cane arches of Cordoba

Candy Cane arches of CordobaSilver filigree – Souvenir shopping in Cordoba

 Candy Cane arches of Cordoba
Candy Cane arches of Cordoba

The flower street

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Our fans from Sevilla came in handy as it was quite hot

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Our lunch at  Las Piconeras was one of the best we had in Andalucía – we had the best Paella,  fried eggplant, olives and salmorejo.

 The Alcázar of the Christian Monarchs, Cordoba

The Alcázar of the Christian Monarchs, Cordoba

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Candy Cane arches of Cordoba
Candy Cane arches of Cordoba
Candy Cane arches of Cordoba
Candy Cane arches of Cordoba
Candy Cane arches of Cordoba
Candy Cane arches of Cordoba
Candy Cane arches of Cordoba
Candy Cane arches of Cordoba
Candy Cane arches of Cordoba

The Roman bridge over the Guadalquivir river

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Candy Cane arches of Cordoba

A little coffee stop before we take the train back to Seville

8 thoughts on “Candy Cane arches of Cordoba”

  1. What stunning architecture and those candy cane arches are just magnificent. The food looks great as well. Thank you for introducing this place to me. I would love to travel there someday.

    1. Thanks for stopping by Constance! Cordoba was magnificent, the arches and city was unique is so many ways, I’m sure you would love it!

  2. I’ve never heard of the Mesquita of Cordoba, so thank you for enlightening me! It looks like you had a wonderful time exploring – such great photos. I do love Spain and how different each region is. Thanks for linking up with #MondayEscapes

    1. Thanks for stopping by MyTravelmonkey. Cordoba was wonderful, you should stop by if you go to Spain again. We would love to go back to visit Madrid and Toledo sometime, it is true these is so many different regions!

  3. Your title made me smile, as I knew exactly what you meant without even looking! It’s a fab place isn’t it? #mondayescapes

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