A Safari in Wyoming at the Grand Teton and Yellowstone National Parks

Yes, a safari in Africa is one of those bucket list experiences but did you know there are some wonderful places in North American where you can see wildlife.  Grand Teton and Yellowstone national parks have more wildlife than anywhere else in the lower 48 states.  You can see bison, grizzly bears, black bears, wolves, foxes, elk, deer, moose, pronghorn if you are lucky maybe even a mountain lion or wolverine.  While summer is a great time for some mountain adventures, fishing and hiking, it is also is a perfect time for a safari.  We wrapped our summer break with a trip to Safari in Wyoming at the Grand Teton and Yellowstone National Parks and the trip was just as special as our trip to East Africa last summer (at 1/10th the cost!)

Wildlife Safari in Wyoming at Grand Teton and Yellowstone

 

A Safari in Wyoming at the American Serengeti - Photo by OutsideSuburbia.com

A wildlife traffic jam in the American Serengeti. They can’t seem to make up their minds about which side of the road they want to be on.

Benefits of a Private Safari in Wyoming at Grand Teton and Yellowstone

Right after we landed in Jackson inside the Grand Teton National Park and made our way to our lodge, our guide from JacksonHole Wildlife Safari picked us up for our first North American Safari!  Kyle picked us up in his white suburban fully equipped with binoculars and scopes to spot wildlife and plenty of snacks and water in re-fillable water bottles.  Since it was a private safari we were able to decide where we wanted to go and what we wanted to see.  We opted to look for wildlife and also stop at some scenic spots along the way like Mormon’s Row, Jenny Lake and a lookout on top of Signal Mountain with a great view of Lake Jackson surrounded by mountains the plains below.

A Safari in Wyoming at the Grand Teton and Yellowstone National Parks with Jackson Hole Wildlife Safari

Kyle our safari guide spotted some bison from the viewpoint up on Signal Mountain and later drove us up close.  We managed to see a couple of big Elks, pronghorns and a moose but sadly had no luck spotting any bears. No grizzly or black bears around!  During fall, black bears are known to frequent the bushes full of berries. It was a little early in the season for huckleberries that the bears come looking for mentioned our experienced naturalist guide. Kyle has a great understanding of the area which comes from years of exploring and studying and the Greater Yellowstone Area.  Jackson Hole Wildlife Safaris is guide owned and operated and is committed to a culture of sustainability.  They can organize multi-day safaris to Yellowstone.  Since we were planning on driving to the park and spend a few days there we opted for a full day safari in Jackson Hole.  We would have to plan for the popular 2-day bear and wolf wildlife photo safari tour in the future! May be in winter when it easier to see them in the dramatic snowy landscape.

Where to see Wildlife in Grand Teton National Park

Jackson, Wyoming has a National Elk Refuge where about 10000 Jackson Elk Herd migrate to during Fall and Winter. The National Elk Refuge is a 25000-acre swath of protected land that provides, preserves, restores, and habitat for this Jackson Elk Herd.  It was established in 1912 by the people of Jackson and the best place to see them in big herds during Fall through early Spring.  A unique way to experience the refuge during winter is by horse-drawn sleigh!

You can see moose, elk and bison in and around Grand Teton National Park – Elk Ranch FlatsWillow Flats and Moose Junction are two prime spots. The partially unpaved Moose-Wilson Road is a popular area to scout for Moose that hangout in the ponds and willows.  A scenic river raft on the Snake River or on the trees near the Oxbow Bend is where you can spot bald eagles.

A Safari in Wyoming at the Grand Teton - Photo by OutsideSuburbia.com

An Elk on the Signal Mountain in Jackson Hole

Where to see Wildlife in Grand Teton National Park - Photo by OutsideSuburbia.com

More Elk, how does it even balance those big antlers! Did you know Elks regrow them every year?

A Safari in Wyoming at the Grand Teton - Photo by OutsideSuburbia.com

A Mama Moose and her baby.  The Moose is the largest antlered animal in the world.  The Bulls weigh about 1200 pounds.

A Safari in Wyoming at the Grand Teton - Photo by OutsideSuburbia.com

Pronghorns are the fastest mammals in the Western Hemisphere and can sprint up to 60 miles per hour. They love eating wildflowers and shrubs

A Safari in Wyoming at the Grand Teton - Photo by OutsideSuburbia.com

Bison is the largest North American mammal and adults can weigh up to 2000 pounds.  These giants are herbivores and happy just grazing but can attach when provoked.  Sometimes referred to as buffalo, they are not related to the African or Asian species.

A Private Safari in Wyoming - Photo by OutsideSuburbia.com

Thanks, Kyle and Jackson Hole Wildlife Safari for taking us on a Safari!

Where to see Wildlife in Yellowstone National Park

Yellowstone National Park is the only place in the United States where wild bison have lived since prehistoric times and the best place to see them is in the Lamar Valley – which is often referred to as the Serengeti of North America.  While you can also spot wolves and foxes here and a few bears (we were not lucky, we saw one way in the distance), there are plenty of bison, elks and moose in the park.  Located mainly in Wyoming, Yellowstone National Park is massive, stretches over 3 states including Idaho and Montana as is over 2.2 million acres!  So naturally, you need to know where to go to see wildlife and have some patience while trying to spot them. Hayden Valley is north of Yellowstone Lake is another good place to see wildlife in Yellowstone National Park.  In summer you can manage a DIY safari as we did but if you are visiting in the shoulder season in the winter months it is better to arrange for a safari with a guide.

A Safari in Wyoming at Yellowstone - Photo by OutsideSuburbia.com

Our first moose spotting in Yellowstone near the Lake

A Safari in Wyoming at Yellowstone - Photo by OutsideSuburbia.com

Wildflowers and bison in Hayden Valley

A Safari in Wyoming at Hayden Valley, Yellowstone - Photo by OutsideSuburbia.com

During a morning drive through Hayden valley we saw bison. A Ranger was not too far away.  He warned when people got too close to the animals and at one point asked us all to get in the car since the herd looked like they were making their way up from the valley.

Where to see Wildlife in Yellowstone National Park - Photo by OutsideSuburbia.com

Sure enough, as soon as we got in the car, we saw this big guy walk past all the cars!

A Safari in Wyoming at Yellowstone - Photo by OutsideSuburbia.com

Elks in Wyoming at Yellowstone - Photo by OutsideSuburbia.com

More Elks!

A Safari in Wyoming at Yellowstone - Photo by OutsideSuburbia.com

Let’s not forget the little guys – a tiny mountain squirrel near the Prismatic Hot Springs

Bison spotting is easy in Lamar Valley, the American Serengeti  - Photo OutsideSuburbia.com

Bison spotting is easy in Lamar Valley, the American Serengeti

A Fox we spotted at Lamar valley, Yellowstone - Photo by OutsideSuburbia.com

A fox we saw in the Lamar valley

We saw this guy out for a morning drink near the Midway Geyser Basin

Some tips to spot Wildlife in Wyoming 

First and foremost – Bring a Binoculars and a nice camera and lens if you want to photograph them as well.  Most photos here were taken with a Nikon with a Nikkor Telephoto 200-400mm lens.   The best time to spot wildlife is at dusk and dawn.  While we were doing our own DIY Safari in Yellowstone, we woke up early to look for wildlife in Hayden valley, took a break then drove to Lamar Valley in the evening.  We stopped at Roosevelt Lodge area for coffee and went looking for wolves at around 7 pm.  Instead of wolves, we spotted a Fox, who was snacking on a rabbit.  Bonus – you get to catch a killer sunset on the way back!

A Safari in Wyoming at Yellowstone - Photo by OutsideSuburbia.com
Wear neutral clothing that will help you blend in with the natural surroundings.  Always drive slowly and stop frequently to scan the landscape for wildlife. Stop when you see a group of people looking in the same direction, and ask if they spotted some animal.  Distances are vast in the parks, with plenty of room for the animals, be patient.

Where to see Wildlife at Yellowstone - Photo by OutsideSuburbia.com

Maintain a healthy distance from wildlife, at least 100 yards away from bears and wolves and 25 yards away from other wildlife.  Bison are faster than they look and will charge, they can jump a 6-foot fence from a standstill and gallop up to 35 mph.

Where to see Wildlife in Yellowstone National Park - Photo by OutsideSuburbia.com

Take those selfies from a safe distance!

Best time to go on a North American Safari in Wyoming

While summer is a popular time to go on a safari in Wyoming at Yellowstone and Grand Teton, traveling during fall or winter increases your chances to see the wildlife.  We were there in summer and were able to see most of the animals we were hoping to see.  If you want to avoid the crowds and have a better chance of seeing wildlife, plan a trip during a shoulder season, like May or October.  Seeing the wildlife in a winter landscape is whole another experience, we are hoping to make this trip again just to see those animals with their furs dusted with snow.  Keep in mind though Grand Teton National Park is open year-round, parts of Yellowstone are inaccessible during the winter months.

A Life lived Wild is a Life well Lived! #KeepWyomingWild - Photo by Priya Vin - OutsideSuburbia.com

With nearly 500 species of animals in Wyoming, a safari definitely was the highlight of our trip. Like the reusable water bottles we got from Jackson Hole Wildlife Safari says – A Life lived Wild is a Life Well Lived!  Social media allows us to geotag really specific places, which means that the places get overrun by selfie takes and Instagrammers, who end up trampling on fragile landscapes and wildlife to go to those places, and in turn, ruining destinations. Remember to geotag responsibly and help Keep Wyoming Wild!

 

You might also like: – A safari in Serengeti and Masai Mara, photos of the Great Migration

 

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