Texas Lavender Fields : Why go to Provence when you can find them right here?

Lavender is a flowering plant in the mint family native to the Old World. These days it can be found from Cape Verde and the Canary Islands, southern Europe across to northern and eastern Africa, the Mediterranean, southwest Asia to southeast India. They are cultivated extensively in temperate climates as ornamental plants for garden and landscape use, and also commercially for the extraction of essential oils. From the beloved fragrance to the beautiful purple color of the flowering plant, lavender fields are a popular destination for photographers.  Visiting the lavender fields of Provence seems to be on everyone’s Wanderlust!  Did you know you can find these beautiful purple carpets of lavender right here in Texas! Yes, there are Lavender Farms in Texas and there is even a Lavender Festival hosted by the city of Blanco.   Here are a few Texas Lavender Fields near Dallas where you will find these pretty purple flowers right here in the Lone Star State!

Lavender-senanque

 

I’m crazy for sunflowers, antique roses, and lavenders!  One of my absolute favorite trips so far is our trip to Provence where we visited some lavender fields.  Since we were there at the end of July, we narrowly missed the peek lavender season by a week.  Lavender in Provence, France is usually harvested by the middle to end of July.  While trying different searches to see if I can find one where the blooms and harvest run a little later, I ran into a site that had pictures of lavender farms in Texas. The sight of the Lavender field in full bloom is a sight to behold, not to mention the smell- miles and miles of purple blankets stretching as far as the eye can see. So to have found it right in our backyard when I have been looking for it halfway across the world.. was exciting, to say the least!! We have these lavender carpets right here in Texas and s Provencal view right here in our backyard!!! …I did some digging into where and when is the perfect time to see the lavender fields in Texas and this is what I found… The ​City of Blanco is the Lavender Capital of Texas and holds a Lavender Festival every year at the beginning of June! I also found some Lavender fields near Dallas, just an hour away!

The History of Texas Lavender Fields

For many years, visitors to the Texas Hill Country have enjoyed the beauty of the rough landscape and winding rivers. Much of this rocky limestone land, however, hasn’t been highly sought after for its agricultural use.

In 1999, Robb Kendrick and his wife, Jeannie Ralston, pioneered the way for a new agricultural industry in the area. Kendrick, a National Geographic photographer, while shooting a story for the magazine in Provence, France, noticed that the hilly terrain and the scorching hot summers there were similar to that found at his land near Blanco in the Texas Hill Country.

In 1999, the Kendricks planted 2,000 plants, paving the way for the current Blanco lavender growers, many of who were inspired by seminars conducted by the Kendricks.

The Blanco Lavender Growers Association has remained a united group, building upon the experiences of the Kendricks. These pioneers have endured periods of non-stop rain and periods of non-existent rain, each time more committed to this new agricultural crop. They readily share each new experience with each other and with guests to the Texas Hill Country who share their love of lavender. They organize the Lavender Festival each year, usually the first week of June.

Lavender Ridge Farms, #Lavender in #Texas near #Dallas

Texas Lavender Fields

Lavender Ridge Farms

Lavender Ridge Farms is located 8 miles east of Gainesville, Texas. Originally a strawberry & melon farm in the 1920s & 1930s, Lavender Ridge Farms opened in 2006 as a lavender, cut-flower, and herb farm. The land here has been in the family for over 150 years and will be home sweet home for many years to come. Apart from the lavender they also have a variety of perennials and lots of birds and hummingbirds visiting. They have cooking classes (with lavender of course) and a café.  The lavender farm is near Dallas and is a perfect place for a day trip to have a picnic or to take a family picture!

Lavender Ridge Farms #Lavender in #Texas

Prayer Lavender Garden

Here is another lavender farm near Dallas, located in Rockwall, Texas. Prayer Lavender Garden is a small, family owned and operated Lavender farm which was established in 2016 after being awarded the Young Farmers Grant from the Texas Department of Agriculture.  The owners opened the public in June 2018.  They over 2000 Lavender plants on their 3-acre farm, along with a variety of herbs, an apiary, an outdoor children’s play area and miniature farm animals. They have a little barn filled with handcrafted Lavender bath/body and culinary products, including freshly roasted coffee, assorted tea blends, and ice cream. They are open Fridays through Sunday and 4th Fridays of the summer months you can enjoy complimentary Lavender Prosecco Punch with your breakfast or lunch while shopping for some lavender products.

Here are a few more Texas Lavender Farms little ways down – in the Hill Country

Hill Country Lavender

Texas’ first commercial lavender farm, Hill Country Lavender offers panoramic views with the lavender plants spread in neat rows across a scenic hilltop.  They offer to cut your own lavender this on certain weekends and beautiful handmade lavender products for purchase year-round from their retail locations.

You can cool off with fresh squeezed lavender lemonade, homemade lavender cookies, stroll through the field and cut your own lavender, purchase lavender plants to take home, and stop by and shop the lavender gift store featuring a full in of lavender products. They currently have two locations, you can see their website for more details.

Hill Country Lavender

 

Imagine Lavender Farm

Imagine Lavender Farm is located in Blanco County on the Rocking “L” Ranch which is owned and operated by the Logue and McFarling families. The lavender fields are set back from the highway to increase serenity and afford sweeping views of the hill country. Their plots of Lavender and designed beds are situated among native landscape to allow native wildlife to remain. These fields have suffered repeated drought over the last few years as has the entire region and therefore has been sustained through partial replanting.

Visitors can enjoy the farm by walking through a lavender labyrinth, a rosary made of lavender, plots of lavender, or enjoy a stroll through the artistic tree stump pathway to the hidden swing concealed by oak trees hundreds of years old. There is also an array of whimsical items placed about the fields, including a handmade gypsy trailer.

During your visit plan on staying for demonstrations of the soap making process on Saturday and Sunday.  They have natural handmade lavender bath, body and culinary products available for purchase as well. They are also an official Monarch Waystation and stands of Milkweek are present in the field for the necessary for the survival of the Butterflies.

Chappell Hill Lavender

An aromatic lavender farm with quaint surroundings and a scenic hillside view,  about 8 miles north of historic Chappell Hill, just off of the Texas Independence Trail. Nestled in the heart of bluebonnet country the farm is a delightful day excursion from most anywhere in South Central Texas, with many other attractions close by.

Three thousand lush plants cascade down over rolling acres to a gazebo and pond offers a peaceful setting for picnics or just relaxing with a cool glass of lavender tea or lavender lemonade.  During the cutting season which usually begins in August, you can stroll the fragrant rows and cut your own fresh lavender. There is no admission charge to visit the Chappell Hill Lavender farm.

Becker Vineyards Lavender Farms

The Becker Lavender Farms is so close to the fields in Provence.  Located in Stonewall near Fredricksburg, three acres of lavender fields were planted alongside the Becker’s impressive winery after the Beckers visited the Rhone region.  The 10,000 square foot reproduction of a nineteenth-century German limestone barn was surrounded by native Texas hardwood trees, fruit trees, a well, windmill, and an 1890 log cabin. But Texas weather wrecked a nightmare on the Becker’s lavender vision and the plants didn’t do well in the heat. The Becker’s kept searching for varieties that stood up to the extreme weather and zeroed in on the Spanish varietal of lavender that did much better in the hill country summer.

Now, visitors to Becker Vineyards can enjoy the rewards of the Becker’s unwavering determination. You can taste award winning wines from the winery and enjoy the lavender fields. Guests can enjoy the lavender blooming season April through May and can stroll through the plants or sit under the pavilion while enjoying a glass of wine. They also offer a myriad of lavender products including handmade lavender soap, eye pillows, sachets, lotion, shower gel, grape seed scrub, lip balm, candles and much more. The Becker Vineyards Lavender Festival takes place on the first weekend of May.

 

What do you do with all that cut lavender from the lavender fields, make some lavender scones and lemonade of course, if you have other recipes that use lavender please share with us! Keep in mind the Blooming season is the end of May – July and that is usually the best time to visit these Texas Lavender fields.

Chappell Hill farm

 

Lavender Scones Recipe

Makes 16 servings

Ingredients

  • 3 cups all-purpose flour plus more for surface
  • 3/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon dried lavender buds
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 3/4 cup (1 1/2 sticks) chilled unsalted butter, cut into 1/4″ cubes
  • 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons buttermilk
  • 2 teaspoons finely grated lemon zest
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 tablespoons sanding or granulated sugar
  • 1 1/2 cups store-bought lemon curd
  • Ingredient info: Dried lavender buds (culinary lavender) are available at some supermarkets and natural foods stores.

Preparation

Arrange racks in upper and lower thirds of the oven; preheat to 425°F. Line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper. Whisk 3 cups flour and next 5 ingredients in a large bowl. Add butter; rub in with your fingers until mixture resembles coarse meal.

Whisk 1 cup buttermilk, zest, and vanilla in a small bowl. Add wet ingredients to dry ingredients. Stir until shaggy dough forms.

Transfer to a lightly floured surface; knead until dough forms, about 5 turns. Pat into a 10×6″ rectangle. Halve dough lengthwise. Cut each half crosswise into 4 squares. Cut each square diagonally in half into 2 triangles. Divide between baking sheets. Brush with 2 tablespoons buttermilk. Sprinkle with sanding sugar.

Bake until scones are golden and a tester inserted into the center comes out clean 13-15 minutes. Transfer to wire racks; let cool.

Serve warm or at room temperature with lemon curd.

Lavender Lemonade Recipe

Make lemonade either from scratch or concentrate. Separately, make a lavender tea, using either our dried lavender in cheesecloth or one of our lavender bath and tea bags. Let the tea steep for about 15 minutes; remove the lavender. Pour the tea into the lemonade. Use about 1 cups of lavender tea for every gallon of lemonade. Add plenty of ice, and a lavender sprig in each glass for a garnish.

Hand Squeezed: (makes 1 gallon) 2 cups sugar 1 1/2 cups lemon juice 1/2 gallon water 1 cup lavender tea (feel free to adjust to your personal taste)

NOTE: From concentrate, mix one can with 2 cups water and 1 cup tea.

Photo from our trip to Southern France when we stopped to smell the lavender near Sault

You might also like: A road trip to see Lavender Fields in France – Texas Road trips from Dallas – Instagrammable spots in Dallas – Cute Coffee stops in and around Dallas – Family Friendly things to do in Dallas and other fun things to do in and around Dallas and the Suburbs.

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Do you have Lavender fields around where you live and what is the best time to visit the fields?

Originally posted in June 2017, updated June 2019.

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